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Seen

On The Design

I think the key to a successful design progression is to choose only one part of the design to change with each progression.

red scarf project

That was my original plan for this scarf. One block of stockinette and reverse stockinette checkers, one block of stockinette and seed stitch checkers, and so forth.

Unfortunately, Wool Ease has terrible stitch definition. After the seed stitch checkers just looked weird and lumpy, and the moss stitch checkers looked even weirder and lumpier, I kind of gave up. So I have blocks of stockinette with reverse stockinette, moss stitch, garter stitch, then diagonals, then mini checkers (eight checkers across), then the same pattern backwards.

See what happened? It just isn’t as coherent as I might have liked.

I probably would have been happier if I had stuck with The Plan, gritted my teeth, and knit those crappy-looking seed stitch blocks. In fact if I make another of these scarves, or if I used a different yarn, I probably would.

It’s not a deal-killer, I think overall it looks just fine. It’s rumpled and quirky-looking, but I think that’s acceptable for college students. Just a “note to self” for the future.

3 comments to On The Design

  • “Rumpled and quirky.” Yup, that’s one of the better descriptions I have ever read of college students.

  • Meg McG

    I really like it! I think it’s a cool concept.
    Forgive my ignorance, but what’s the difference between moss and seed stitch?

  • Erika

    That’s one of those things that manifests as a national difference. I learned seed stitch as being one stitch and moss stitch being two stitches. But I’m guessing you know those as moss and double moss. The first stitch dictionary I ever bought was originally a German publication, so it has the European names. Same diff!