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Liz Lemon’s Scarf: The First Repeat

I spent some quality time with the scarf last week, and finally finished the first pattern repeat. I’m thinking of this scarf as “inspired by,” because the more closely I looked at the original, the more I saw patterns I wanted to substitute.

liz lemon scarf

The first pattern repeat is 33 inches long. Stop here, or work a second repeat for a 66-inch long scarf?

As you can see, I’ve left it on the needles, because I haven’t made my decision yet. This would make a fine tuck-in scarf. And since it’s essentially four layers of yarn (knitting / yarn strands / yarn strands / knitting), it’s quite warm.

Also if I stopped here I could start knitting something else, which would be nice, because this scarf is getting boring.

liz lemon scarf

This is my most favorite motif. I call it “flecky triangles.” Flecky triangles are deployed in several motifs, but I’m particularly smitten with the combination of green flecky triangles and yellow zig zags.

liz lemon scarf

This is my least favorite motif. It’s one of only two motifs which breaks the overall “colored pattern against white background” pattern. I picked it at random out of my Vogue Stitchionary, and it looked a lot niftier on the page.

Every time I look at it, I do a double-take because I think I see a swastika. Please tell me you have the same experience?

liz lemon scarf

Someone asked if I was making effort to de-jog the stripes at the end of each round. The answer is, “Pfft, no.” This is a bigger problem with some motifs than others. (Yet another reason to like Flecky Triangles and Zig Zags.)

liz lemon scarf

This is a photograph of the best page in the colorwork Vogue Stitchionary. That pattern is named “Kang and Kodos.”

12 comments to Liz Lemon’s Scarf: The First Repeat

  • ayla

    I don’t see swastikas. I really think that’s a good thing, since at least if we don’t see them, you won’t have random strangers thinking you’re walking around with swastikas on your neck.

  • I do not see swastikas either. In fact, that may be my favorite pattern of the bunch. (You may kick me now.) Mostly, though, I am in awe that you actually knit all that beautiful stranded knitting.

  • 1. I don’t see them either.

    2. For a while, I’ve been wanting to make a pair of socks using that Kang and Kodos pattern. Except I hate doing stranded colorwork, so I haven’t.

  • Meg McG

    No swastikas. But make it loooonger! I am in scarf hell right now and would like someone else to share my pain.

  • I don’t see swastikas, either.
    Hate to say it, but you’ll be happier with it if you make it longer.

  • Chiming in with another ‘longer is better.’ More annoying, I know! But it will make a much better scarf. (I love the purple bits, and nope, no swastikas!)

  • Jennifer

    I would just point out that you wrote the title to this post, and you yourself called it the “First Repeat”. I think your subconscious mind wants you to make it longer.

  • Go for 66! Go for 66! (You’ll note that Liz Lemon’s scarf is longish, as far as I can tell from the photo…)

    This is such a *fun* scarf!

  • Whendi

    Every time I knit a scarf it ends up taking more time than I think it should. I can’t imagine how much time it would take to make something so intricate.

  • kellys

    Longer is better on some things. Like scarves and cuffs on mitts.

    Of course, the fact that you are able to do this continues to boggle my weak mind. pretty durn awesome. It’ll look great when you’re chopping wood.

    ps remember the baby sweater? yeah, my imp was wearing it today. A bit short, but, she was soooooooooo cute in it. Next time, a pic.

  • Melsa

    Nope to the swastikas. But I’m going to play devils advocate and say leave it! It’ll be nice and warm and serve it’s purpose. And you won’t resent it for taking over your brain.

  • […] decided that Jennifer was very perceptive. She pointed out that I had called it the “first repeat,” which presumes the existence […]